As you approach the Islands’ capital city of Valletta, your eyes will fix onto the Grand Harbour, with the reflection of the hearty sun bouncing off crisp breezy waves, while the majestic bastions glance into the depths below.

Grand Harbour’s┬áreputation as one of the safest natural havens in the Mediterranean is not its only charm. This magnificent port is a living display of Malta’s rich heritage of archaeology, history, architecture, art and culture – all dating back to 7,000 years.

Nowadays, the Grand Harbour has become an irresistible scene for over 250 cruise ships, with almost 700,000 passengers onboard, which visit Malta every year on their Mediterranean itineraries.

The history of the Maltese Islands is intertwined with that of the Mediterranean Basin, with the major civilizations of the area having moored on Malta due to commercial interests with merchant galleys, or even in military operations with fully armed warships. From the times of the ancient Phoenicians to Malta’s role as home port for the Royal Navy’s Mediterranean fleet, Maltese ports have hosted a diverse range of sea craft from various countries. Now that Malta is an independent republic and a new member of the European Union, its harbours are known best to commercial ships, cruise liners, chartered and private yachts as well as nautical aficionados. The coastline’s craggy inlets and bays, most of which wonderfully secluded and inaccessible from land, provide the privilege of mooring for a swim or lunching on board in privacy. Malta boasts over 750 metres of quay space dedicated exclusively to the sailing leisure market.

Climate

Malta’s weather and climate are strongly influenced by the sea and have a very characteristic Mediterranean flavour, similar to that found in southern Italy. The climate is typically Mediterranean, with hot, dry summers, warm and sporadically wet autumns, and short, cool winters with adequate rainfall. Nearly three-fourths of the total annual rainfall of about 600 mm (24 inches) falls between October and March; June, July, and August are normally quite dry.
The climate is typically Mediterranean, with hot, dry summers, warm and sporadically wet autumns, and short, cool winters with adequate rainfall. Nearly three-fourths of the total annual rainfall of about 600 mm (24 inches) falls between October and March; June, July, and August are normally quite dry.

Malta’s weather and climate are strongly influenced by the sea and have a very characteristic Mediterranean flavour, similar to that found in southern Italy. The climate is typically Mediterranean, with hot, dry summers, warm and sporadically wet autumns, and short, cool winters with adequate rainfall. Nearly three-fourths of the total annual rainfall of about 600 mm (24 inches) falls between October and March; June, July, and August are normally quite dry.
The climate is typically Mediterranean, with hot, dry summers, warm and sporadically wet autumns, and short, cool winters with adequate rainfall. Nearly three-fourths of the total annual rainfall of about 600 mm (24 inches) falls between October and March; June, July, and August are normally quite dry.

Places of interests

As you approach the Islands’ capital city of Valletta, your eyes will fix onto the Grand Harbour, with the reflection of the hearty sun bouncing off crisp breezy waves, while the majestic bastions glance into the depths below.

Grand Harbour’s┬áreputation as one of the safest natural havens in the Mediterranean is not its only charm. This magnificent port is a living display of Malta’s rich heritage of archaeology, history, architecture, art and culture – all dating back to 7,000 years.

Nowadays, the Grand Harbour has become an irresistible scene for over 250 cruise ships, with almost 700,000 passengers onboard, which visit Malta every year on their Mediterranean itineraries.

The history of the Maltese Islands is intertwined with that of the Mediterranean Basin, with the major civilizations of the area having moored on Malta due to commercial interests with merchant galleys, or even in military operations with fully armed warships. From the times of the ancient Phoenicians to Malta’s role as home port for the Royal Navy’s Mediterranean fleet, Maltese ports have hosted a diverse range of sea craft from various countries. Now that Malta is an independent republic and a new member of the European Union, its harbours are known best to commercial ships, cruise liners, chartered and private yachts as well as nautical aficionados. The coastline’s craggy inlets and bays, most of which wonderfully secluded and inaccessible from land, provide the privilege of mooring for a swim or lunching on board in privacy. Malta boasts over 750 metres of quay space dedicated exclusively to the sailing leisure market.

Valletta

Museums
  • Lascaris War Rooms
  • The National War Museum
  • Saluting Battery
  • Fortifications Interpretation Centre
  • National Museum of Archaeology
Visual shows
  • The Knights Hospitallers
  • The great siege of Malta and The Knights of St John
  • The Malta Experience
  • Sacred Island
  • The wartime experience
Churches
  • St John’s Co-Cathedral
  • St Paul’s Anglican pro-cathedral
  • Basilica of Our Lady of Porto
  • Salvo and St Dominic
  • St Paul Shipwrecked
Garderns
  • Yeah man, that was good.
  • Let’s do another one.

Historical buildings

Visual shows
  • The Knights Hospitallers
  • The great siege of Malta and The Knights of St John
  • The Malta Experience
  • Sacred Island
  • The wartime experience

Rabat

Visual shows
  • The Knights Hospitallers
  • The great siege of Malta and The Knights of St John
  • The Malta Experience
  • Sacred Island
  • The wartime experience
Churches
  • St John’s Co-Cathedral
  • St Paul’s Anglican pro-cathedral
  • Basilica of Our Lady of Porto
  • Salvo and St Dominic
  • St Paul Shipwrecked

Kalkara

  • St John’s Co-Cathedral

Mosta

  • St John’s Co-Cathedral

  • St John’s Co-Cathedral
  • St Paul’s Anglican pro-cathedral
  • Basilica of Our Lady of Porto
  • Salvo and St Dominic
  • St Paul Shipwrecked

Prehistoric Sites

  • St John’s Co-Cathedral
  • St Paul’s Anglican pro-cathedral
  • Basilica of Our Lady of Porto
  • Salvo and St Dominic
  • St Paul Shipwrecked

Vittoriosa

  • St John’s Co-Cathedral
  • St Paul’s Anglican pro-cathedral
  • Basilica of Our Lady of Porto
  • Salvo and St Dominic
  • St Paul Shipwrecked

Mgarr

  • St John’s Co-Cathedral
  • St Paul’s Anglican pro-cathedral
  • Basilica of Our Lady of Porto
  • Salvo and St Dominic
  • St Paul Shipwrecked

Siggiewi

  • St John’s Co-Cathedral

Zabbar

  • St John’s Co-Cathedral
  • St Paul Shipwrecked